Google searches of the phrase “can I change my vote” peaked Tuesday morning in the U.S. around 6 a.m. ET.

“Can I change my vote” was trending on Google over the weekend — following the second debate between President Donald Trump and 2020 Democrat candidate Joe Biden, as well as new revelations involving Joe Biden’s son Hunter and his alleged laptop.

While most states do not allow voters to change their early votes, there are some that do, with restrictions.

In New York

If you have submitted an absentee ballot but change your mind, you can show up to your polling place during early voting or on Election Day and cast a vote, in which case the absentee ballot is set aside and not counted, according to the state Board of Elections.

“Even if you request or cast and return an absentee ballot, you may still go to the polls and vote in person,” according to the New York State Board of Election.

“The Election Law recognizes that plans change. The Board of Elections is required to check the poll book before canvassing any absentee ballot. If the voter comes to the poll site, on Election Day or during early voting and votes in person, the absentee ballot is set aside and not counted.”

For more information, click here.

In Michigan: Can I change my vote?

Voters who have sent in a ballot can submit a written and signed request to their voting clerk by 5 p.m. Oct. 30 requesting to have the ballot nullified, according to the Detroit Free Press.

In New Hampshire

Voters who submitted an absentee ballot can go to the polls on Election Day during the first hour they’re open and vote in person, or before their absentee ballot is processed.

In Wisconsin: Can I change my vote?

If time allows, a voter can cancel their original absentee ballot and request a new one – but they have until Oct. 29, the legal deadline for requesting absentee ballots by mail.

Pennsylvania

If you’d like to change your absentee ballot vote, you must do so in-person up to Election Day, according to Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

If you’ve requested a mail-in ballot and have yet to send it in, and now want to vote in-person, the state says “you will need to bring both your mail-in or absentee ballot AND the outer return envelope to your polling place.”

Florida: Can I change my vote? 

Florida residents who voted by mail “can vote with a provisional ballot on Election Day,” the New York Post reported Tuesday. “Election officials urge voters to bring ballots not sent in the mail with them to the polling place.”

Check with your local elections board for more information.

Arizona 

Arizona residents who voted by mail “can vote with a provisional ballot on Election Day,” the New York Post said. “Election officials urge voters to bring ballots not sent in the mail with them to the polling place.”

Check with your local elections board for more information.

Washington: Can I change my vote?

“Washington state also allows voters to ‘cancel a ballot at any time before Election Day,’ said [Matthew] Weil, the Election Project director, with the state not counting any mailed-in votes until polling closes,” The New York Post reported.

Idaho 

Residents of Idaho who voted by mail “can vote with a provisional ballot on Election Day,” the New York Post said. “Election officials urge voters to bring ballots not sent in the mail with them to the polling place.”

Check with your local elections board for more information.

In several other states, including Illinois, Delaware, New Mexico, Idaho, Indiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi, voters are allowed to “spoil” a ballot and request another, but only if the initial ballot hasn’t yet been returned or, in some cases, processed. 

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