Senate lawmakers acquitted former President Donald Trump for a second time Saturday, marking the end of a five-year campaign by Democrats to achieve the top item on their agenda before, during, and after Trump’s one-term presidency.

Fifty-seven senators voted to convict Trump. A conviction requires a 67 vote supermajority.

Senate acquits Trump for 2nd time, just one year after first impeachment attempt

The weekend vote acquitted Trump on charges of “incitement of insurrection,” passed by the lower-chamber last month in a snap impeachment featuring no hearings and no witnesses, exactly one week after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Ultimately seven Republicans joined with 48 Senate Democrats and two Independents in voting to impeach Trump, bringing the final tally to 57-43, ten votes short of the 67 needed to convict.

Trump’s second acquittal by the Senate comes almost exactly a year after the upper chamber dismissed two articles passed by Democrats in a soap opera show trial over charges of abuse of power and obstruction of justice.

This year’s impeachment, pursued by Democrats even after the president left office, focused on the January riot at the Capitol that featured a horde of Trump supporters interfering with congressional certification of the electoral college vote. Democrats in the House were joined by 10 Republicans in their impeachment vote over Trump’s alleged incitement, despite the former president’s explicit call for his supporters to protest peacefully before the riot. (Detail)

Donald Trump’s full statement on impeachment trial acquittal

I want to first thank my team of dedicated lawyers and others for their tireless work upholding justice and defending truth.

My deepest thanks as well to all of the United States Senators and Members of Congress who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.

Our cherished Constitutional Republic was founded on the impartial rule of law, the indispensable safeguard for our liberties, our rights and our freedoms.

It is a sad commentary on our times that one political party in America is given a free pass to denigrate the rule of law, defame law enforcement, cheer mobs, excuse rioters, and transform justice into a tool of political vengeance, and persecute, blacklist, cancel and suppress all people and viewpoints with whom or which they disagree. I always have, and always will, be a champion for the unwavering rule of law, the heroes of law enforcement, and the right of Americans to peacefully and honorably debate the issues of the day without malice and without hate.

This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country. No president has ever gone through anything like it, and it continues because our opponents cannot forget the almost 75 million people, the highest number ever for a sitting president, who voted for us just a few short months ago.

I also want to convey my gratitude to the millions of decent, hardworking, law-abiding, God-and-Country loving citizens who have bravely supported these important principles in these very difficult and challenging times.

Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun. In the months ahead I have much to share with you, and I look forward to continuing our incredible journey together to achieve American greatness for all of our people. There has never been anything like it!

We have so much work ahead of us, and soon we will emerge with a vision for a bright, radiant, and limitless American future.

Together there is nothing we cannot accomplish.

We remain one People, one family, and one glorious nation under God, and it’s our responsibility to preserve this magnificent inheritance for our children and for generations of Americans to come.

May God bless all of you, and may God forever bless the United States of America.

Pelosi furious about impeachment trial results, rules out censuring Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said she’s not interested in censuring former President Donald Trump after the Senate acquitted Trump in his second impeachment trial.

She implied that censuring Trump would be similar to giving “a little slap on the wrist.”

“We censure people for using stationaries for the wrong purpose. You don’t censure people for inciting insurrection that kills people in the Capitol,” she added.

She seemed furious about the result of the impeachment trials. She slapped on the table several times and criticized the senators who voted against the conviction as a “cowardly group of Republicans.” (Detail)

“What we saw in the Senate today was a cowardly group of Republicans who apparently have no options, because they were afraid to defend their job, respect the institution in which they serve,” she told reporters on Saturday.

GOP Minority Leader Mitch McConnell voted against convicting the president, after delaying an impeachment trial while Mr Trump was still in office then twice voting that the trial would be unconstitutional because Mr Trump was not in office.

Speaker Pelosi slammed his remarks as “very disingenuous.”

“It is so pathetic that Senator McConnell kept the Senate shut down so that the Senate could not receive the Article of Impeachment and has used that as his excuse for not voting to convict Donald Trump,” she said.

In a prepared statement, Speaker Pelosi said “Republicans’ refusal to hold Trump accountable for igniting a violent insurrection to cling to power will go down as one of the darkest days and most dishonourable acts in our nation’s history.”

“Tragically, Senate Republicans who voted not to convict chose to abandon the Constitution, the country and the American people with this vote,” she said.

Seven Republicans voted to convict Trump in Senate impeachment trial

Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in the Senate impeachment trial.

These seven Senate Republicans voted to impeach Trump:

  • North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr
  • Lousiana Sen. Bill Cassidy
  • Maine Sen. Susan Collins
  • Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski
  • Utah Sen. Mitt Romney
  • Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse
  • Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey

Burr released a statement after the vote explaining why he voted to impeach Trump.

“As I said on January 6th, the President bears responsibility for these tragic events. The evidence is compelling that President Trump is guilty of inciting an insurrection against a coequal branch of government and that the charge rises to the level of high Crimes and Misdemeanors. Therefore, I have voted to convict,” Burr said. “I do not make this decision lightly, but I believe it is necessary.

“By what he did and by what he did not do, President Trump violated his oath of office to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States,” he continued.