Ben Shapiro has reviewed Squid Game, calling the record-breaking Netflix series “communist.”

“It is a dystopian thriller and so, the politics are very communistic in nature,” Shapiro said in his YouTube review of the Korean drama.

He describes the basic premise of Squid Game as a cross between The Hunger Games and Parasite.

Shapiro says that the series’ politics are “extraordinarily far to the left” and questions why it has such a big budget and international platform for this reason.

“The basic idea is that capitalism provides so little opportunity that you would rather play a game where you might get shot just to make money, than attempt to live out your life in the regular world,” Shapiro says.

“Everybody sort of goes back to the regular life and then, of course, they end up going back to the game because they have no options in the outside world. And this really brings us to the central, sort of parasite aspect, of Squid Game. It is a dystopian thriller and so the politics are very communistic in nature. The politics for this very large budget show, which is being shown on Netflix, which is a high market cap tech company, are extraordinarily far to the left. The basic idea is that capitalism provides so little opportunity that you would rather play a game where you might get shot just to make money, then attempt to live out your life in the regular world.”

Ben Shapiro

The show’s creator Hwang Dong-hyuk has explained the meaning of Squid Game, telling Variety: “I wanted to write a story that was an allegory or fable about modern capitalist society, something that depicts an extreme competition, somewhat like the extreme competition of life.”

“These days we are, in fact, living in a deeply unfair and economically challenging world,” Hwang told The Hollywood Reporter.

Squid Game is about hundreds of cash-strapped players who accept a strange invitation to compete in children’s games. Inside, a tempting prize awaits — with deadly high stakes unknown to contestants when the games begin.

Hwang also explained that he wanted viewers to think about who created the systems we as a society live in and who benefits from it.

“Communicating the message that you should not be dragged along by the competitive flow of society, but that you should start thinking about who has created the whole system—and whether there is some potential for you to turn back and face it,” he said.