According to financial disclosure records, left-wing billionaire megadonor George Soros gave another half-million dollars to a group supporting embattled California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

On Monday, Soros donated $500,000 to the organization “Stop the Republican Recall of Governor Newsom.” Soros had previously contributed $500,000 to this Democratic group, Fox News reports.

While Newsom has a significant fundraising advantage over his opponents, the race is shaping up to be closer than many expected.

Soros’ latest investment in the race comes at a time when conservative radio host Larry Elder is widely regarded as the leading challenger to replace Newsom in this month’s recall election. Elder, if elected, would be California’s first Black governor.

Democrats have recently increased their attacks on Elder, attempting to link his candidacy to that of former President Trump.

In a fundraising email last month, Newsom slammed Elder, claiming that he and Trump are the same person.

“If this guy is governor during delta it would lead to extraordinary suffering,” Newsom claimed in the email. “His anti-science approach would move our planet backward in the race against a changing climate. He would be a disaster for California.”

The email also referred to Elder as “Larry Trump.”

The California gubernatorial recall election is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Democrats, unions pour cash into California recall fight

According to reports filed with the California secretary of state’s office, the Democratic Governors Association has contributed $5 million to Newsom’s campaign committee since the beginning of August, including a $1 million infusion on Tuesday.

At the same time, unions with enormous clout in California politics, ranging from the state Conference of Carpenters to the Service Employees International Union and the International Association of Fire Fighters, have contributed nearly as much. In recent weeks, Native American tribes have contributed $1 million.

Because of a California state law that treats the recount campaign as a ballot measure, Newsom’s team has been allowed to raise an unlimited amount of late cash. Committees running ballot measure campaigns are not bound by the contribution limits that apply to candidates, including those running to replace Newsom if he is recalled.

The relative disparity has given Newsom a significant advantage on the airwaves. According to the nonpartisan media monitoring firm AdImpact, pro-Newsom campaigns and independent groups have spent or reserved nearly $30 million in airtime across the state. Republican candidates seeking to unseat Newsom have spent or reserved less than half of the total amount raised.