A key witness in the US Department of Justice case against Julian Assange has acknowledged to fabricating crucial accusati­ons in the indictment against the Wikileaks founder.

A key witness in the US Department of Justice case against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has acknowledged to inventing crucial claims in the indictment. The witness, who has a documented history of sociopathy and has several convictions for sexual abuse of minors and wide-ranging financial fraud, made the admission in a newly published interview in Stundin, where he also confessed to continuing his crime spree while working with the Department of Justice and FBI and receiving immunity from prosecution.

The guy in question, Sigurdur Ingi Thordarson, was hired by US officials to create a case against Assange after deceiving them into thinking he was a close associate of his earlier. In truth, he had volunteered on a limited basis in 2010 to generate funds for Wikileaks, but was later discovered to have utilized that chance to steal more than $50,000 from the group. Julian Assange was in Thordarson’s home country of Iceland at the time because of his work with Icelandic media and members of parliament on the Icelandic Modern Media Initiative, a press freedom project that resulted in a parliamentary resolution supporting whistleblowers and investigative journalism.

The US is presently seeking Assange’s extradition from the UK in order to prosecute him for espionage related to the dissemination of leaked sensitive papers. He faces up to 175 years in jail if convicted. The indictment has raised concerns about press freedom in the United States and elsewhere, prompting strong remarks in favor of Assange from Amnesty International, Reporters Without Borders, the editorial board of the Washington Post, and others.

Last July, US officials brought a revised version of an indictment against him to a Magistrate court in London. The principal witness, on whose testimony it is based, has now explicitly refuted the accuracy of the information contained within.

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