NBA players Jonathan Isaac and Bradley Beal on why they are “hesitant” to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

‘I would start with — I had COVID’: NBA Player Orlando Magic

During a media briefing, Orlando Magic player Jonathan Isaac explained why he refuses to get the COVID-19 vaccine, claiming that he has already been infected with the virus.

He contended that, among other things, his prior encounter with COVID-19 had most likely imbued him with antibodies to fight off another COVID-19 infection. He stated that receiving the vaccine now could result in “an adverse reaction to the vaccine itself.”

The fourth-year NBA forward made his case in response to a recent Rolling Stone article about the NBA’s battle over vaccine mandates.

“When NBA players started lining up for shots in March, Isaac started studying black history and watching Donald Trump’s press conferences,” the piece says.

Addressing the Rolling Stone piece directly, Isaac said he was misrepresented in the article. “I didn’t come to my current vaccination status by studying black history or watching Donald Trump press conferences,” he said.

Last year, in the midst of a societal uproar over police brutality, Isaac took a literal stand by refusing to kneel alongside his teammates and the rest of the NBA before games played in the Orlando “bubble.”

Isaac is able to remain unvaccinated because the NBA vaccine mandate does not apply to players, despite the fact that it does apply to virtually all other team and league personnel. However, unvaccinated players face a significant challenge because city-specific vaccine mandates, such as those in San Francisco and New York City, would prevent them from entering NBA arenas.

So far, no NBA player has been granted a religious or medical exemption. (Source: Daily Caller)

Why NBA player Bradley Beal hasn’t gotten the COVID-19 vaccine

Bradley Beal, a Wizards All-Star, revealed Monday during the team’s media day that he has not received a COVID-19 vaccine for personal reasons.

“I don’t feel pressure, I don’t think you can pressure anybody to making a decision about their body or what they put into their body,” Beal told reporters. “We can have this conversation about a lot of different topics besides vaccines, too. You can’t necessarily force anybody, I think you kind of let people come into their own about it.”

Beal, 28, was diagnosed with COVID-19 in July, forcing him to withdraw from Team USA’s 12-man roster for the Tokyo Olympics. Before Team USA confirmed Jerami Grant would replace him at the Summer Games, the three-time All-Star was placed under the team’s health and safety protocol.

“Yeah I had it, but that doesn’t mean I can’t get it again,” Beal said. “I mean it’s no different than somebody with the vaccine. Yes, I developed antibodies for it, so my chances will be less likely for it as well. It’s still a possibility, just like there are players and coaches and staff who are vaxxed that are missing camp as well.”

Beal explained that while he had COVID-19, he “didn’t get sick at all,” but he did lose his sense of smell.

“I would like an explanation to people with vaccines, why are they still getting COVID?” Beal said. “If that’s something we’re supposed to highly be protected from, that’s funny that it only reduces your chances of going to the hospital. It doesn’t eliminate anyone from getting COVID.”

(Source: New York Post)

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