The show of Conservative talk show legend Rush Limbaugh will be replaced by a pair of “fresh voices” in Buck Sexton and Clay Travis, Premiere Networks announced on Thursday.

The Clay Travis & Buck Sexton Show will air weekdays from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. on hundreds of radio stations around the country.

Limbaugh, one of the most influential media figures of the past 30 years, died in February at age 70 after a battle with lung cancer.

Who are Clay Travis and Buck Sexton?

Travis currently hosts Fox Sports Radio’s “Outkick The Coverage with Clay Travis” and is founder of media company Outkick.com. Sexton is host of “The Buck Sexton Show,” a political commentator and former CIA officer and NYPD counterterrorism expert.

The two experienced radio hosts, who frequently appear on Fox News, hope to cultivate a younger audience while honoring Limbaugh’s legacy.

Travis, 42, and Sexton, 39, are decades younger than the 70-year-old Limbaugh, who died in February. The hosts both told the Wall Street Journal that they are hoping to reach a younger audience, which tends to tune out talk radio.

“No one ever replaces a legend, and Rush Limbaugh was the most influential and listened to radio voice across multiple generations,” Travis wrote on OutKick Thursday. “But the battles Rush fought aren’t ending. If anything, they’re just becoming more intense. And I think intense and rigorous and intelligent debate has never been more important in this country than it is right now.”

Sexton said he and Travis represented a new generation of Americans who are concerned about the country and tired of feeling they can’t speak out.

“The most dominant talk radio hosts have been from one generation; Clay and I represent the next phase. We’re going to bring the perspective of two guys who see a country they’re deeply worried about, and a massive audience that needs people who will speak for them,” Sexton told the Journal.

Sexton, a frequent guest on Fox News, has been critical of Black Lives Matter protests and accused Democrats of “ballot-counting shenanigans” during last year’s presidential election.

Rush Limbaugh is irreplaceable

“We’re not going to replace Rush Limbaugh, we’re going to have an evolution of the show with fresh voices—those that grew up on Rush and admired him,” Premiere president Julie Talbott told the Wall Street Journal.

Since Limbaugh’s death in February, the time slot has been filled with guest hosts and old tapes of Limbaugh. He died at age 70 after a battle with lung cancer, a diagnosis he announced himself on his show in 2020.

The radio icon played a consequential role in conservative politics since “The Rush Limbaugh Show” debuted in 1988. Perched behind his Golden EIB (Excellence in Broadcasting) Microphone, Limbaugh spent over three decades as one of the most beloved, as well as polarizing, figures in American media.

Limbaugh’s show was the most listened-to talk radio broadcast in the USA, bringing a cumulative weekly audience of about 15.5 million listeners at his peak, according to Talkers’ tracking. “No one beats Rush in the political news talk radio format – he’s No. 1,” Harrison said.